Ethics Unwrapped Blog

My Group Versus Your Group

It seems obvious that people should judge the ethicality of others’ actions in an objective and fair way.  What is not so obvious is how difficult it often is to do that.  One reason why it is difficult to make such objective judgments is our tendency to sort ourselves and others into groups and to […]

Continue Reading

Ethics Education: Part II

In my last blog entry, I discussed Melissa Korn’s recent Wall Street Journal article entitled “Does an ‘A’ in Ethics Have Any Value?”  I argued that business schools should teach ethics because, first, schools should teach what they think is important.  Second, I argued that B-schools should train those students who do wish to act […]

Continue Reading

Ethics in Politics

The inability of Congress and the President to work together to avoid the “fiscal cliff” until well after their failure to do so had caused real damage to the American economy highlights a deeply troubling problem in the U.S. democratic system.  It is tempting to put all the blame on politicians for America’s bitter ideological […]

Continue Reading

Lincoln the Movie

There are two primary means of resolving ethical dilemmas.  The deontological approach is rules-based–don’t lie, don’t steal, keep your promises, etc.  Then there’s the teleological or utilitarian approach, which judges the morality of competing approaches by their consequences (“greatest good for the greatest number”). Both approaches are respectable.  They often lead to the same conclusion […]

Continue Reading